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Mexican Charro Beans With Ham

Mexican Charro Beans With Ham


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This hearty dinner uses only 5 ingredients

Recipe Courtesy of Reluctant Entertainer and Bush’s Beans

“Dress up pinto beans with a bit of bacon, leftover Easter ham, and pico de gallo salsa to make this Mexican Charro Beans with Ham recipe that’s stick-to-your-ribs delicious!”

-Sandy

Ingredients

For the Charro Beans with Ham

  • 4 Slices uncooked bacon, chopped
  • 1 Cup precooked ham, diced
  • 14 Ounces pico de gallo, store bought or freshly made
  • 1 Medium onion, chopped
  • 4 Cups pinto beans, such as Bush's Pinto Beans
  • Salt, to taste

Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.


Charro Beans

Charro Beans are traditional Mexican beans and are known as either Frijoles Charros or Cowboy Beans. This traditional bean recipe is a hearty soup made with pinto beans in a light broth with loads of seasonings. My Charro Beans recipe is flavored with bacon, ham, chorizo, onions, chilies, tomatoes, spices, and herbs.

Charro Beans are perfect for feeding a crowd and is a great side dish at a cookout. Traditionally, Frijoles Charros were ranch food, meant to feed a crew of hungry cowboys (Charros). I always substitute Charro Beans for the refried beans when I go out for Mexican food. Frijoles charros aren’t always on the menu, but I’ve never been to a Mexican restaurant that didn’t have them.

In wintertime, I like to make my charro beans from scratch. However, in the summer I prefer to use canned beans, it’s just too dang hot to simmer dried beans for 2-3 hours. A good quality canned bean is just fine in this instance and all the additional meats and spices make them out of this world delicious.

When making frijoles charros in the summertime, I use bacon, ham, and chorizo in my recipe. However, all of these can be pretty salty, therefore you’ll need to wait until the end of cooking to decide if you need any additional salt or not.

In the winter, I add a rack of baby back pork ribs. Along with the bacon, ham, and chorizo, the ribs add the most amazing flavor to the beans. The long simmer time to cook the charro beans is perfect for the ribs, the meat falls off the bone, perfectly tender and delicious. These are seriously the best frijoles charros recipe, and it can’t get much better.