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Spaghetti Squash Aglio e Olio

Spaghetti Squash Aglio e Olio


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Portofino's, in Atlanta is where Italian and American flavors meet, chef Matt Marcus serves up a unique take on...

Portofino's, in Atlanta is where Italian and American flavors meet, chef Matt Marcus serves up a unique take on the classic Neapolitan aglio e olio dish made with garlic and olive oil. Instead of using traditional spaghetti, Marcus incorporates spaghetti squash “noodles.” Portofino’s spaghetti squash aglio e olio is a hit at the restaurant, offering a healthy and approachable alternative to the classic.

Ingredients

  • 1 large spaghetti squash, split lengthwise
  • 2 Ounces safflower oil
  • 2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
  • 2 Tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 Tablespoons black pepper

Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?


Spaghetti Squash Aglio E Olio with Sausage and Kale

My friends, the struggle is real. My heart says pasta, and my diet says wine no. This is one of my favorite lightened up versions of aglio e olio to make. And in my opinion, it’s just. as. satisfying. Is it because there’s three pounds a [very generous] cup of cheese in it? Maybe. And salty little bits of hot Italian sausage? Probably. But you know what, there’s no pasta. And the net carbs in this baby is virtually negative. So go forth, have an extra glass of wine [er, or three] with this.

Now I’m kind of a garlic addict, and put way to much garlic in everything, so of course this is right up my alley – a justifiable excuse to use 8 cloves in a single dish. Just make sure you brush your teeth afterward… #PSA for your someone special.

In case you’re asking yourself what ‘aglio e olio’ actually translates into, it’s “spaghetti with garlic and oil” in Italian. Sauteed garlic + olive oil + goblets of Parmesan + a touch of crushed red pepper = dreamy. And what better guilt-free vehicle to use to get all of that scrumptiousness into your mouth than spaghetti squash? Answer: none.

For me, the trick to spaghetti squash is simply not roasting it into oblivion. If you cook it until it’s just tender enough to scrape into pasta-like strands, it’s perfect — and still has it’s texture. I feel the exact same way about zucchini noodles. When using pasta substitutes, texture is king, and let’s be honest, nobody likes mush.

So for those of you out there feeling like you still need all of the comfort food feels without nearly as much guilt, this is right up your alley. And I mean really, there’s kale in this. Doesn’t that offset any calories from cheese and olive oil?